Poems, he says, “are like buoys in the sea. I swim from one to the next; in between, without them, I am lost.”
Anselm Kiefer in the FT.
Reporting from Isma’iliyah, Egypt in 2011, on the aftermath of ouster of Hosni Mubarak. #tbt #onassignment #journalism

Reporting from Isma’iliyah, Egypt in 2011, on the aftermath of ouster of Hosni Mubarak. #tbt #onassignment #journalism

An Evening of Poetry at Unnameable Books — A Dark Wave Production

Sunday, September 28, 2014, 6:00 p.m.

Unnameable Books, 600 Vanderbilt Ave., Brooklyn, NY.

Cheap wine made possible by the indispensable beverage brokers at Wino(t).

Jana Prikryl's poems have been published or are forthcoming in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, the London Review of Books, and The Stinging Fly (in Dublin). She is a senior editor at The New York Review of Books, and her critical essays appear regularly in The New York Review and in The Nation. She has been a resident at Yaddo, a visiting writer at the American Academy in Rome, and received a creative writing grant from the Canada Council for the Arts. Born in the Czech Republic, she grew up in Canada and has lived in New York since 2003.

Erica Ehrenberg’s poems have appeared in journals and anthologies including Slate, The New Republic, CURA, The St. Ann’s Review, Octopus, jubilat, Everyman’s Library Pocket Poet Series, Guernica, and the New England Review. She has been a Wallace Stegner Fellow in poetry at Stanford, a poetry fellow at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown and at the Vermont Studio Center, a writer-in-residence at the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, and has been in residence at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts and at Yaddo. She has also recently given talks at the Storm King Sculpture Center on poetry and sculpture, and has written in collaboration with and about contemporary artists for Real Art Ways in Hartford, CT and for a project that premiered at the New Shelter Plan gallery in Copenhagen as part of the 2014 Artist Run International Festival.

Nichole Caruso is a Brooklyn-based poet who works as a gallerist and curator in Chelsea. She formerly co-ran a small press out of Philadelphia, which published small editions by artists, musicians and poets in collaboration with The Heartworm Press. She now has her own operation called Pari Passu, which does very little except produce “poetic objects” on an as needed basis. These objects are made by hand and contain some volume of her poetry and can only be obtained if you want to deal with having an exchange with Nichole. Single poem ‘zines are available for free. She wants to apologize in advance if the one poem you get isn’t a good one. 

Robert S. Eshelman(host) is Cultural Attaché for A Dark Wave Production and a Brooklyn, New York-based journalist. His articles have appeared in The American Prospect, The Baffler, VICE News, Columbia Journalism Review, The Nation, and Mother Jones, among other publications. He is a frequent contributor to The Brooklyn Rail and worked on the Emmy-winning documentary series “Years of Living Dangerously.”

Climate Change Activists Set to Flood NYC, but Some Doubt the UN’s Approach to the Problem

By Robert S. Eshelman, reporting for VICE News

When United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called on world leaders to attend a one-day climate change summit in New York City on September 23, climate change campaigners seized on the opportunity to kick-start momentum toward an international climate treaty in Paris in the fall of 2015, the deadline world leaders have agreed upon to adopt a framework for an agreement.

On September 21, tens of thousands of people, perhaps as many as a hundred thousand, are expected to descend on Manhattan for the People’s Climate March, which promises to be the largest climate change demonstration in history.

Among the groups organizing the march is the activist network Avaaz, which has had a large presence at past international climate talks.

"This particular moment being prioritized was really driven by the UN," Avaaz Executive Director Ricken Patel told VICE News. "The secretary-general’s office said, ‘Look, we really don’t have the political momentum that we need to achieve an agreement.’ Then we as activists responded by saying we need to be out in the streets to help build that momentum."

[Caption: Activists are targeting the fossil fuel industry directly and highlighting the grave consequences of unchecked climate change. (Photo by Mikael Miettinen)]

But some in the climate change movement regard the focus on securing an international climate treaty under the auspices of the UN as a strategic error. They view the march as a perverse replay of the mobilizations at annual UN climate summits that haven’t produced a legally binding agreement on curbing global greenhouse gas emissions, which the World Meteorological Organization recently warned are at a record high.

[Continue reading]

Save the date. #poetry (at Unnameable Books)

Save the date. #poetry (at Unnameable Books)

An indigenous woman marches toward the opening session of the 2010 World People’s Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth in Cochabamba, Bolivia. 30,000 people from over 100 countries attended the conference in response to the failed 2009 climate talks in Copenhagen. #tbt #climatechange #journalism #onassignment #bolivia (at Cochabamba, Bolivia)

An indigenous woman marches toward the opening session of the 2010 World People’s Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth in Cochabamba, Bolivia. 30,000 people from over 100 countries attended the conference in response to the failed 2009 climate talks in Copenhagen. #tbt #climatechange #journalism #onassignment #bolivia (at Cochabamba, Bolivia)

The End of Fracking Is Closer Than You Think

By Robert S. Eshelman, reporting for VICE News

Canadian geologist David Hughes has some sober news for the Kool-Aid-drinking boosters of the United States’ newfound eminence in fossil fuel production: it’s going to go bust sooner rather than later.

Working with the Post Carbon Institute, a sustainability think-tank, Hughes meticulously analyzed industry data from 65,000 US shale oil and natural gas wells that use the much-ballyhooed extraction method of hydraulic fracturing, colloquially known as fracking. The process involves drilling horizontally as well as vertically, and then pumping a toxic cocktail of pressurized water, sand, and chemicals deep underground in order to break apart the rock formations that hold deposits of oil and gas.

Hughes found that the production rates at these wells decline, on average, 85 percent over three years.

"Typically, in the first year there may be a 70 percent decline," Hughes told VICE News. "Second year, maybe 40 percent; third year, 30 percent. So the decline rate is a hyperbolic curve. But nonetheless, by the time you get to three years, you’re talking 80 or 85 percent decline for most of these wells."

His conclusion calls into question the viability of developing a long-term national energy policy on the assumption that fossil fuel extraction will continue at current levels. Several new natural gas export terminals are under consideration across the country, and the energy industry is pushing for the reversal of a 1970s Congressional ban on crude oil exports. Calls to approve the Keystone XL pipeline and allow for greater transportation of oil and gas over the nation’s rail lines are also based on the revolution in domestic energy production.

America’s political elites are embracing the promise of American energy independence — and that, Hughes believes, is pure folly.

[Continue reading]

Stencil template for @peoplesclimate banner. Spent the afternoon at activist convergence center in #Bushwick, where many groups are gearing up for the Sept. 21st climate march. On assignment for @vicenews. #climatechange #peoplesclimate

Stencil template for @peoplesclimate banner. Spent the afternoon at activist convergence center in #Bushwick, where many groups are gearing up for the Sept. 21st climate march. On assignment for @vicenews. #climatechange #peoplesclimate

Massawa Lawson, a volunteer w/ @Peoples_Climate, canvasses the public ahead of a planned Sept. 21 climate march in New York City, which organizers say could attract 100,000 participants. U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has called on world leaders to attend a one day climate summit on Sept. 23 at the U.N. in an effort to build momentum toward adoption of an international climate treat in 2015. On assignment for @vicenews. #peoplesclimate #climatechange #avaaz #un #vicenews #journalism #itshotout (at Brooklyn Public Library)

Massawa Lawson, a volunteer w/ @Peoples_Climate, canvasses the public ahead of a planned Sept. 21 climate march in New York City, which organizers say could attract 100,000 participants. U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has called on world leaders to attend a one day climate summit on Sept. 23 at the U.N. in an effort to build momentum toward adoption of an international climate treat in 2015. On assignment for @vicenews. #peoplesclimate #climatechange #avaaz #un #vicenews #journalism #itshotout (at Brooklyn Public Library)

E.E. Cummings.

E.E. Cummings.